Rohit Talwar: Today’s children could live to 120 and work to 100. What’s all the fuss?

Culture, Philosophy, and Humanity , Culture, Society and Art , Rohit Talwar

Article bei Rohit Talwar, CEO of FastFuture, published February 7, 2017:

“When I told a conference recently that today’s children may need to work until the age of 100, the Times called it “the stuff of nightmares”. The Washington Post told parents expecting a better life for their little ones to “think again”. This generation may need to prepare themselves to work in 40 or more different jobs in a fast-changing world where the boundaries between what humans and machines do will continue to shift.

It is easy to see why people find this picture shocking today, but this is a very plausible scenario and should come as no surprise to policymakers: the topic has been discussed by futurists, ageing experts, economists, technologists, and social commentators for more than a decade. As societies around the planet increase their life expectancy, the challenge will become increasingly global, and its implications are far-reaching enough to merit a close examination of the underlying trends and drivers.

There are four key factors at play: life expectancy; personal health and well-being; the impact of automation on jobs; and the gap between individual income and expenditure

Rising life expectancy

Right now, average UK life expectancy is just over 80 and has gone up quite dramatically over the last century. It is a similar level in many of the more developed economies and rising fast in several parts of the developing world. This is a result of access to and advances in healthcare, improved living conditions, better diets, greater awareness of health issues, and a range of other factors. As we look ahead to the next 100 years, scientific breakthroughs and more routine advances in healthcare, mental health and diet in particular, could bring an even more dramatic scale of change.”

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