Unlocking the potential of the Internet of Things (nice McKinsey report)

Automation , Big Data , Digital Transformation , Internet of Things , IoT , Report , Rudy de Waele

Although The Internet of Things (#IoT) is still listed as one of the top hypes in Gartner’s 2015 Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies this year, a new McKinsey Global Institute report, The Internet of Things: Mapping the value beyond the hype, attempts to determine exactly how IoT technology can create real economic value.

The central finding in the report is that the hype may actually understate the full potential—but that capturing it will require an understanding of where real value can be created and a successful effort to address a set of systems issues, including interoperability.

According the report, the IoT has a total potential economic impact of $3.9 trillion to $11.1 trillion a year by 2025. At the top end, that level of value—including the consumer surplus—would be equivalent to about 11 percent of the world economy.

IoT Forecast McKinsey

Some of the other findings in the report, include:

  • Interoperability between IoT systems is critical. Of the total potential economic value the IoT enables, interoperability is required for 40 percent on average and for nearly 60 percent in some settings.
  • Currently, most IoT data are not used. For example, on an oil rig that has 30,000 sensors, only 1 percent of the data are examined. That’s because this information is used mostly to detect and control anomalies—not for optimization and prediction, which provide the greatest value.
  • Business-to-business applications will probably capture more value—nearly 70 percent of it—than consumer uses, although consumer applications, such as fitness monitors and self-driving cars, attract the most attention and can create significant value, too.
  • The IoT has a large potential in developing economies. Still, we estimate that it will have a higher overall value impact in advanced economies because of the higher value per use. However, developing economies could generate nearly 40 percent of the IoT’s value, and nearly half in some settings.
  • Customers will capture most of the benefits. We estimate that IoT users (businesses, other organizations, and consumers) could capture 90 percent of the value that IoT applications generate. For example, in 2025 remote monitoring could create as much as $1.1 trillion a year in value by improving the health of chronic-disease patients.
  • A dynamic industry is evolving around IoT technology. As in other technology waves, both incumbents and new players have opportunities. Digitization blurs the lines between technology companies and other types of businesses; makers of industrial machinery, for example, are creating new business models by using IoT links and data to offer their products as a service.

Download the full report.

Related posts:

Gartner’s 2015 Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies

Why The Internet Of Things Will Drive A Knowledge Revolution

IoT Shifts Conference, Barcelona, October 19-20

Gerd Leonhard on the unintended consequences of the IoT: proceed with caution

And some related slides courtesy of Gerd Leonhard:

A collection of Gerd Leonhard's key messages: what the immediate future hold for us?

A collection of Gerd Leonhard's key messages: what the immediate future hold for us?

A collection of Gerd Leonhard's key messages: what the immediate future hold for us?

A collection of Gerd Leonhard's key messages: what the immediate future hold for us?

A collection of Gerd Leonhard's key messages: what the immediate future hold for us?

A collection of Gerd Leonhard's key messages: what the immediate future hold for us?

Posted by Rudy de Waele aka @mtrends / shift2020.com

(cover image by McKinsey)

 

Rudy de Waele

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