Posts Tagged ‘machines‘

Why there aren’t yet nanobot doctors

Nanobots is one of those “must know” hype words if you’re following technology evolution in the health sector. Scientists have long said that tiny robots would soon be able to conduct surgery and deliver drugs deep inside the body. In this article in The Atlantic, you can

Disruptive Power Lies at the Intersections

When I first started using the term “Combinatorial”, people thought I was making words up. Although I’d like to take credit for the word, I first came across it when reading The Second Machine Age, a fascinating book by Andrew McAfee and Eric Brynjolfsson. I

Fei-Fei Li: We need to teach machines to see

And by “see” Li means to understand context, not just content. Among other things, she wants robots to not only relay what they see, but to tell stories about it. Creative stories. Maybe creative jobs aren’t as safe from the robot uprising as we all

Why Playful Learning Is The Key To Prosperity

“In order for our global society to develop solutions to pressing problems in an increasingly technology-driven and constantly changing world, we need to re-train our workforce to do what machines can’t: to be enterprising, independent and strategic thinkers—to be purposeful creators.” https://www.forbes.com/sites/ashoka/2014/04/10/why-playful-learning-is-the-key-to-prosperity/?utm_campaign=forbestwittersf&utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=social 

‘Gods’ Make Comeback at Toyota as Humans Steal Jobs From Robots

Link: ‘Gods’ Make Comeback at Toyota as Humans Steal Jobs From Robots Inside Toyota Motor Corp.’s oldest plant, there’s a corner where humans have taken over from robots in thwacking glowing lumps of metal into crankshafts. This is Mitsuru Kawai’s vision of the future.

Futuristic Tales: iRobot

Link: mostlysignssomeportents: My new Guardian column is “Why it is not possible to regulate robots,” which discusses where and how robots can be regulated, and whether there is any sensible ground for “robot law” as distinct from “computer law.” One thing that is glaringly absent